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Dawnine Dyer
 
December 5, 2011 | Dawnine Dyer

Golden Slumbers

I’m not sure exactly how a vineyard can look sleepy, but somehow these soft yellows and golds seem to say "time to rest." I took this picture just after Thanksgiving and the yellow leaves are a sure sign that the vines have done their work for the year and are taking their annual vacation until some time in March.

Just after harvest and before dormancy the vines go through what is called “root flush” which is   important to their performance in 2012. Their inner clock tells them that, before they can rest, they need to transfer the remaining nutrients from the leaves to the roots, where they’ll be stored all winter, and get them off to a good start come springtime. Kind of like having a protein milkshake for breakfast.

Driving up and down Highway 29 and Silverado Trail this time of year is truly spectacular. You’ll see shades of yellow, peach, red and burgundy – this year some are so dark that they almost look black!

Our vineyard wasn't as spectacularly colored as some, but that’s just fine with us because it tells us that the vines are healthy. It’s an unfortunate fact of life that those beautiful reds in the vineyard indicate virus which shrinks the yield and makes it harder for the grapes to ripen.

Shortly after I took this picture we had a series of very windy days and our vines and trees are completely bare now. Before we can take a vacation it’s important for us to get our cover crop going so we don’t have erosion problems during the rainy season. You might be surprised to know that winter is normally a very soggy season here. Our annual rainfall, virtually all of which comes in the winter, is well over 30 inches! When you visit in the summertime, and things look so dry, it’s hard to imagine. 

Other than that, there’s not much to do in the vineyard until we prune the vines in February or early March.

In the cellar, the wines are bubbling their way through “secondary” fermentation in barrels. More on that in my next post.
 

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